Living with ambiguity in the Anglican Communion: Archbishop Welby’s Address to the Synod

These are some initial observations on Archbishop Justin Welby’s Presidential Address to the General Synod of the Church of England. He spoke to the synod about the recent Primates’ Meeting in canterbury

Firstly, I was very impressed by his openness. He spoke of the difficulties the Anglican Communion faces, the divisions over issues of sexuality and the nature of marriage. It is hard to imagine such honesty from, say, a pope – even Pope Francis in all his spontaneity. I am impressed by the maturity which seems to exist in Anglicanism. He did not seek to downplay the difficulties, to paper over uncomfortable truths. The Archbishop’s description of the way the Primates washed each others’ feet was also moving. This was a group of men (sadly no women) who met together as Christ’s disciples, seeking to do His will. And they decided to walk together, not to walk apart, despite the cost. The Archbishop spoke of the personal commitment of each Primate to walk together, again a sign of maturity.

That maturity is required in Anglicanism because, as the Archbishop pointed out, the Provinces are bound together in charity, not by legal bonds, not be authority structures. And should that not be how we should be as God’s people?

The Archbishop also spoke of ‘reception’. I think this is an important concept. It was much discussed at the time of the ordination of women to the priesthood in the early 1990s. It is only in retrospect that we can see, not by some legal process but by a developing consensus of the Church, that an innovation is of God. The ordination of women has been received (though it will probably be some time before it is fully accepted), that of lay presidency at the Eucharist has not. We have to live with ambiguity, painful as that sometimes is, in the meantime.

And that is where I want to leave these initial observations. The Archbishop said much else that was good. But to me the living with necessary ambiguity, which is part of the human condition and the Christian life, is a sign of our maturity. Children want certainty. Adults accept ambiguity. Anglicanism chooses adulthood over childhood.

“When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: But when I became a man, I put away childish things.” (1 Cor. 13:11)