Mr Murdoch, Miss Hall and the evolution of marriage

This weekend gone Rupert Murdoch, the Australian press baron and Knight of the Papal Order of St Gregory the Great, married his fourth wife. Jerry Hall, his new wife, has been married before, though the marriage was declared invalid by the British Courts. All ten children from the happy couple’s previous marriages attended the subsequent blessing of this civil marriage, which was performed by a Priest of the Church of England in the Church of St Bride, Fleet Street, London.

Marriage is a universal institution. It is not specific to the Christian faith. It is also, clearly, and evolving institution. In the Roman Republic kinship ties were easily created (by adoption) and easily dissolved (by divorce). Like many Roman institutions, marriage (and the family) was profoundly changed by Christianity. Adoption and divorce became practically unknown until the modern period. By the Sixth century, the Church was blessing marriages in the context of the Eucharist. A whole theology of marriage, which saw it as a representation between Christ and the Church, was developed.

In England the Deceased Wife’s Sister’s Marriage Act was finally passed in 1907, and the Deceased Brother’s Widow’s Marriage Act in 1921. These followed almost a century of opposition from the Church of England over what the Table of Kindred and Affinity in the Book of Common Prayer regarded as marriage within the prohibited degrees.

So the question may reasonably, I think, be asked: Given that no one, seemingly, within the Church of England, regards marriage as a static institution, and given that the Church of England is willing to bless a union such as that of the new Mr and Mrs Murdoch, why should a monogamous life-long union between two people of the same sex be beyond the Church’s blessing?